Capture. Edit. Share: Film Making on iPad

Over the last few years I’ve been running workshops using iPads; video editing, audio (AudioBoo), animation, image manipulation and more. I can tailor them to young people from 7yrs and up; however I’ve found that there are also a number of adults who would like to know how to use their new devices more creatively. (If as an individual, or member of a group, would like training then drop me a message…)

Perth iMovie Feeback

So, it was great to be back in Perth this week working with ‘Living Communities‘.

I ran a film making workshop (one pupil’s feedback above) with the assistance of two dancers from Space, Dundee College’s Dance Academy. Obviously it’s useful having some form of content to capture, but having the dancers gave us something quite dynamic to film without having to worry about scripts, cues, or plot lines and so on.

The format of the day was that the dancers did a presentation in the main hall. They then came up with a shorter piece which they repeated throughout the morning and afternoon. The pupils suggested the locations, found their filming positions and took turns fulfilling the various roles required, filming, clapperboard, extras, etc…
They then had 45mins to edit what they’d captured down to between 60-90 seconds. Finally we had the Fast Film Festival where every group presented their film.

The video below is a summary of the workshop:

Each group was made up of between 2 and four pupils and one iPad. Collaboration and sharing was the team’s responsibility and though we had a very larger group they handled the challenges of filming together really well.

Coincidentally, I recently did some filming with SmallPetitKlein, dance studio in Dundee. This next video is one of the initial rough edits of a collaborative piece for the ‘Sense of Place’ exhibition at McManus. It proved very useful this week as an example of what the pupils in Perth could achieve. (The final outcome that resulted from this film is currently in the exhibition at The McManus, Dundee.)

For your iConsideration

iphone-oscar-app1

I’ve been delivering workshops over the last few months on capturing and editing digital content on mobile devices. Digital video and photography is nothing new of course, but, in recent years, colour correcting and editing content on the same device has become more than just a domestic option… many devices available to purchase on a modest budget, combined with software costing no more than your lunch money, can be your camera, your editing suite and your means of uploading to the web. In reality you can make an HD quality short movie and upload within minutes of completing the edit.

For the digital journalist, the ability to do this offers obvious benefits and potential – but is  this tech limited to nothing more than online content..?

Well, based on my experience with the media, available apps and subsequent results, I was poised to write about where I saw the potential this method of filmaking offers beyond YouTube, Vlogging or school projects.

Last summer I was commissioned by The Young Foundation to make a series of short films for a social innovation project. Initially I was a little shy about revealing my filmaking kit – an iPhone, an iPad and a laptop. However, I felt convinced that, given the sensitive nature of what I was to film (homeless hostels), smaller and less-intrusive kit would offer me a greater advantage over larger, very intimidating, HD broadcast quality digital cameras.

During this time I was reminded of a film released almost 10 years earlier – Tarnation (2003) was a documentary gathered from 20 years of ‘Super 8’ film and analogue video footage. The ‘first time’ film maker gathered his content, digitised it and edited together in Apple’s iMovie, the freebie digital movie editor bundled free on all Macs. At the time the iMovie application was ‘Final Cut Express-lite’ – ‘Final Cut Express‘ being ‘Final Cut-lite’. But this new documentary maker, 1) Didn’t know the difference and 2) didn’t have the money to use anything else – even the kit he had was loaned.

Within a few years of release Tarnation had garnered 8 film festival awards and several other nominations.

So, ten years back to the present, just as I’m about to write about where iPhone movie-making could be taking us in years to come, I find this on CNN – “$1.99 iPhone app saved Oscars film

I recommend you watch the clip but, essentially, within a few hours of me publishing this post, Searching for Sugarman (2012) may well be an Oscar winner, due (in a small but essential way), to a few essential ‘iPhone-captured’ shots!

iPhone app

The possibility of ever seeing a feature film made on an iPhone is highly unlikely. However, there are plenty of good reasons why we might see an Oscar/BFI/Cannes/etc… nominated documentary, (or even a short film) that was captured, edited and published on an ‘iDevice’.

The downside of course is that there may well be an awful lot more rubbish to wade through – however, a true creative spirit will always find a way… and so maybe, just maybe, one of next years golden statute winners is already walking around with a golden opportunity in their pocket.

UPDATE: Maybe you already know the story, but Searching For Sugarman won the Oscar for Best Documentary 2013 – congratulations to al involved!

sugar-man-oscar

Guildtown Project (via AudioBoo)

Guildtown was founded in 1818 by the Guildry Incorporation of Perth.

The Primary School, through a series of interlinked projects (many of them delivered through the Living Communities Programme at Perth Museum and Art Gallery), explored the Guildsmen and the trades that they governed. They also made a mini-documentary including a recreation of how the village may have looked 200 years ago.

In this series of three clips some of the young people involved talk about their learning experience, the trades they learned about and tried out and how they got on making their short film.

My part in this was to capture these thoughts and share them through this AudioBoo which is tagged to artworks, related to the project, currently exhibited at Perth Museum and Art Gallery, via a QR Code.

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Creative Speed Dating

I attended Fife Creativity Xchange 2012 (#CXFife12) last week where I presented my Balmullo History QR Code Safari. Held at packed Rothes Halls, Glenrothes, it was a well attended event where 10 groups presented creative educational projects in a ‘speed dating’ format. I’m fine with creativity, but ‘speed dating‘? This was a new experience!

Each project was sat at a table and, on arrival, the attendees were appointed one of the 10 tables to start at. After the opening key note (Fife Director of Education – very good!) each project had 10 mins to present (a countdown clock was projected onto the main screen), at the end of which an alarm would sound, attendees moved on to the next table and the process started again.

The cons: As a presenter, 1) I didn’t get to hear about the other projects and 2) I had to listen to myself 10 times! Nothing could be done about 1) but 2) turned into a little challenge in it’s own right and I quite enjoyed it – reiterating the presentation on the fly was really good practice – and by the time I’d got to 8) it was really flying!

The Pros: (Besides the Pros which came out of the Cons…) Having talked to a room of 60 – 100 and beyond I’ve never had so much immediate feedback from one session. I’d present for about 6-7 mins and then 2 or 3 mins would easily be filled with a combination of questions and feedback.

Standing on a stage doesn’t suit everyone or put them at their best. Likewise, not everyone is up for approaching a speaker so this process solved both of those problems.

It’s not for every event (Would TED have been as successful in this format?) but I think the ‘speed dating’ approach is a good alternative to bear in mind.

Anyone had similar experiences..?

Thanks to all who contributed to the organisation of #CXFife12 and turned up, contributed and made it a genuinely worthwhile afternoon! For more on the QR Safari go here.